Sinead Moran MSc Student

Enquires into a Healthier, Greener, Less Greedier World

Bibliography

References for: Health Co-benefits of eating a sustainable diet

  1. Kim, J., et al., Low-dielectric-constant polyimide aerogel composite films with low water uptake. Polymer Journal, 2016.
  2. Laura Wellesley, C.H.a.A.F., Changing Climate, Changing Diets Pathways to Lower Meat Consumption. 2015, The Royal Institute of International Affairs Chatham House: London, UK.
  3. Pradhan, P., D.E. Reusser, and J.P. Kropp, Embodied greenhouse gas emissions in diets. PLoS One, 2013. 8(5): p. e62228.
  4. Sranacharoenpong, K., et al., The environmental cost of protein food choices. Public Health Nutr, 2015. 18(11): p. 2067-73.
  5. Bailey, R., . Froggatt, Antony,. Wellesley, Laura., Livestock – Climate Change’s Forgotten Sector Global Public Opinion on Meat and Dairy Consumption. 2014, Chatham House: UK.
  6. Bajželj, B., et al., Importance of food-demand management for climate mitigation. Nature Climate Change, 2014. 4(10): p. 924-929.
  7. Chong, B., . Du, Jenny,. Grager, Matt,. Sherry, Jaclyn,. Ugaz, Hugo,. , Eating for Tomorrow: HOW CHINA’S FOOD CHOICES CAN HELP MITIGATE CLIMATE CHANGE. 2016, WildAid San Francisco,.
  8. Dibb, S., Fitzpatrick, Ian. , Let’s talk about meat: changing dietary behaviour for the 21st century. 2014, Eating Better UK.
  9. Song M, Fung TT, Hu FB, et al. Association of Animal and Plant Protein Intake With All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality. JAMA Intern Med. Published online August 01, 2016. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.4182.

References for: The geography and complexities of ‘meat’ carbon footprints

  1. Head, M., et al., Life cycle impacts of protein-rich foods: creating robust yet extensive life cycle models for use in a consumer app. Journal of Cleaner Production, 2014. 73: p. 165-174.
  2. Opio, C., Gerber, P., Mottet, A., Falcucci, A., Tempio, G., MacLeod, M., Vellinga, T., Henderson, B. and H. & Steinfeld, Greenhouse gas emissions from ruminant supply chains, A global life cycle assessment. 2013, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO),: Rome.
  3. Scarborough, P., et al., Dietary greenhouse gas emissions of meat-eaters, fish-eaters, vegetarians and vegans in the UK. Clim Change, 2014. 125(2): p. 179-192.
  4. Nijdam, D., T. Rood, and H. Westhoek, The price of protein: Review of land use and carbon footprints from life cycle assessments of animal food products and their substitutes. Food Policy, 2012. 37(6): p. 760-770.
  5. Röös, E., L. Ekelund, and H. Tjärnemo, Communicating the environmental impact of meat production: challenges in the development of a Swedish meat guide. Journal of Cleaner Production, 2014. 73: p. 154-164.

References for “Climate conscious dietary guidelines”

  1. Tilman, D. and M. Clark, Global diets link environmental sustainability and human health. Nature, 2014. 515(7528): p. 518-22.
  2. Scarborough, P., et al., Dietary greenhouse gas emissions of meat-eaters, fish-eaters, vegetarians and vegans in the UK. Clim Change, 2014. 125(2): p. 179-192.
  3. Brambila-Macias, J., . Shankar, Bhavani,. Capacci, Sara,. Mazzocchi, Mario,. and F.J.A. Perez-Cueto, Verbeke,Wim,. Traill, W. Bruce,. Policy interventions to promote healthy eating: A review of what works, what does not, and what is promising. Food and Nutrition Bulletin,, 2011. 32(4).
  4. Garnett, T., . Mathewson, Sophie,. and P. Angelides, . Borthwick, Fiona., Policies and actions to shift eating patterns: What works? A review of the evidence of the effectiveness of interventions aimed at shifting diets in more sustainable and healthy directions. 2015, Food Climate Research Network Oxford.
  5. Gonzalez Fischer, C.G., Tara,. Plates, pyramids, planet; Developments in national healthy and sustainable dietary guidelines: a state of play assessment. 2016, FCRN: Oxford.
  6. Chong, B., . Du, Jenny,. Grager, Matt,. Sherry, Jaclyn,. Ugaz, Hugo,. , Eating for Tomorrow: HOW CHINA’S FOOD CHOICES CAN HELP MITIGATE CLIMATE CHANGE. 2016, WildAid San Francisco,.
  7. Stehfest, E., et al., Climate benefits of changing diet. Climatic Change, 2009. 95(1-2): p. 83-102.
  8. Popp, A., H. Lotze-Campen, and B. Bodirsky, Food consumption, diet shifts and associated non-CO2 greenhouse gases from agricultural production. Global Environmental Change, 2010. 20(3): p. 451-462.
  9. McMichael, A.J., et al., Food, livestock production, energy, climate change, and health. The Lancet, 2007. 370(9594): p. 1253-1263.
  10. Bailey, R., . Froggatt, Antony,. Wellesley, Laura., Livestock – Climate Change’s Forgotten Sector Global Public Opinion on Meat and Dairy Consumption. 2014, Chatham House: UK.

References for “Diets & Climate Change | What you eat matters”

  1. Bajželj, B., et al., Importance of food-demand management for climate mitigation. Nature Climate Change, 2014. 4(10): p. 924-929.
  2. Garnett, T., Livestock-related greenhouse gas emissions: impacts and options for policy makers. Environmental Science & Policy, 2009. 12(4): p. 491-503.
  3. FAO, Tackling climate change through a global assessment of emissions and mitigation opportunities. 2013.
  4. Scarborough, P., et al., Dietary greenhouse gas emissions of meat-eaters, fish-eaters, vegetarians and vegans in the UK. Clim Change, 2014. 125(2): p. 179-192.
  5. Hallström, E., E. Röös, and P. Börjesson, Sustainable meat consumption: A quantitative analysis of nutritional intake, greenhouse gas emissions and land use from a Swedish perspective. Food Policy, 2014. 47: p. 81-90.
  6. Nijdam, D., T. Rood, and H. Westhoek, The price of protein: Review of land use and carbon footprints from life cycle assessments of animal food products and their substitutes. Food Policy, 2012. 37(6): p. 760-770.
  7. European Commission, Sustainable Food A recipe for food security and environmental protection?, S.C. Unit, Editor. 2013, European Commission: University of the West of England, Bristol.
  8. Lang, T. and D. Barling, Nutrition and sustainability: an emerging food policy discourse. Proc Nutr Soc, 2013. 72(1): p. 1-12.
  9. Tilman, D. and M. Clark, Global diets link environmental sustainability and human health. Nature, 2014. 515(7528): p. 518-22.
  10. Scarborough, P., et al., Modelling the health impact of environmentally sustainable dietary scenarios in the UK. Eur J Clin Nutr, 2012. 66(6): p. 710-5.
  11. Bailey, R., . Froggatt, Antony,. Wellesley, Laura., Livestock – Climate Change’s Forgotten Sector Global Public Opinion onMeat and Dairy Consumption. 2014, Chatham House: UK.
  12. Alexandratos, N., . Bruinsma, Jelle,. WORLD AGRICULTURE TOWARDS 2030/2050, in ESA Working Paper No. 12-03. 2012, FAO: Agricultural Development Economics Division.
  13. Steinfeld, H., . Gerber, Pierre,. Wassenaar, Tom,. Castel, Vincent,. Rosales, Mauricio,. Haan, Cees de,. livestock’s long shadow, environmental issues and options. 2006, FAO: Rome.
References “The CCAFS Problem”
  1. Foley, J.A., et al., Solutions for a cultivated planet. Nature, 2011. 478(7369): p. 337-42.
  2. FAO, World agriculture: towards 2030/2050. Prospects for food, nutrition, agriculture and major commodity groups. 2006.
  3. Smith, P., et al., How much land-based greenhouse gas mitigation can be achieved without compromising food security and environmental goals? Glob Chang Biol, 2013. 19(8): p. 2285-302.
  4. Lang, T. and D. Barling, Nutrition and sustainability: an emerging food policy discourse. Proc Nutr Soc, 2013. 72(1): p. 1-12
  5. IPCC, Climate Change: Mitigation. Contribution of Working Group III to the Third Assessment Report. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, 2007.
  6. FAO, Tackling climate change through a global assessment of emissions and mitigation opportunities. 2013.
  7. European Commission, Sustainable Food A recipe for food security and environmental protection?, S.C. Unit, Editor. 2013, European Commission: University of the West of England, Bristol.
  8. ForumfortheFuture, TheFuture of Protein, The Protein Challenge 2040: Shaping the future of food. 2015, Forum for the Future.
  9. Garnett, T., Food sustainability: problems, perspectives and solutions. Proc Nutr Soc, 2013. 72(1): p. 29-39.
  10. Alsaffar, A.A., Sustainable diets: The interaction between food industry, nutrition, health and the environment. Food Sci Technol Int, 2016. 22(2): p. 102-11.
  11. FAO, Biodiversity and sustainable deits 2010, FAO: Rome.
  12. Pelletier, N. and P. Tyedmers, Forecasting potential global environmental costs of livestock production 2000-2050. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 2010. 107(43): p. 18371-4.
  13. OECD, <A green growth stradegy for agriculture.pdf>. 2011, OECD: Paris, .
  14. Alexandratos, N., . Bruinsma, Jelle,. WORLD AGRICULTURE TOWARDS 2030/2050, in ESA Working Paper No. 12-03. 2012, FAO: Agricultural Development Economics Division.
Comments are closed.